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Sculpture



Sculpture in British Fishing Ports


Sculpture 1
Sculpture 1
Hastings, Sussex
Sculpture
Sculpture 2
Whitby, Yorkshire
Sculpture 3
Sculpture 3
Deal, Kent
Sculpture 4
Sculpture 4
Sculpture 5
Sculpture 1
Whitby
Sculpture 6
Sculpture 6
Stonehaven
Sculpture 7
Sculpture 7
Peterhead
Sculpture 8
Sculpture 8

Notes on Sculpture

There is a wide variety of sculpture in fishing communities and these reflect the use of a wide variety of materials: wood, glass, bronze, stone, metal, and so on. The examples here reflect this variety. Sculpture 1 celebrates the Winkle Club in Hastings, of which Winston Churchill was perhaps their most famous member.


Australia

Although fishing communities in Australia do not have the wealth of history that is present in European fishing communities, there is a growing use of local materials for a range of artistic exressions.

During a recent visit to Australia (summer 2004) Stephen Friend met with Geelong artist, Jan mitchell, some of whose work is illustrated below. She kindly spent some time with me explaining how she came to create characters out of two metre high wooden bollards. She then told me a little about her background. Having studied art in Melbourne she later worked for twenty years in Dublin. This was followed by a move to Newcastle and later East Anglia (both in England), working as an illustrator and designer, especially for children's TV programmes. Following a period working as a print designer she moved to Geelong, Victoria, her adopted city, and worked with some schoolchildren making characters out of small bollards. She gradually worked her way up to full-size models and the examples here illustrate some of her current work. Prior to making each model, Jan spends a lot of time researching biographies and local history in order to get a feel for her models. Of one famous historical character, Matthew Flinders, Jan said "I spent ages researching his character and trying to find out what colour his eyes were - they were blue."

Jan is especially proud that the 104 Baywalk Bollards along the Geelong coast are an integral part of the improvement in the town's image, and a strong attraction to tourists. When I asked how she viewed her work in relation to the town, she said she was concerned, "not just to create characters for public view, but to contribute to the positive identity of the community."

Jan is seen here working on her latest creation, a bollard portraying the famous Australian opera singer, Dame Nellie Melba. (The pictures can be enlarged by clicking on them).

Sculpture 1
Artist Jan Mitchell
Sculpture
The Volunteer Rifle Band
Playing "The Geelong Polka"
Sculpture 3
Scallop Fishermen
and Woman
Sculpture 4
Nuns

The photo below represents the "Geelong Photographic Club". Two passing young ladies kindly agreed to have their photo taken as members of the group.

The rabbit seen at the foot of the first and fourth bollards (from the left) is a symbol present on many of Jan's sculptures. It was in Geelong, in 1859, that Thomas Austin imported ten pairs of rabbits into the country in order to amuse himself shooting them. Clearly he missed more that he shot and the rabbits have mulitplied - not just on Jan's bollards!

Sculpture 5
The Geelong Photographic Club