Fish Boat


 Introduction

 E-Mail

 Poetry
 & Prose

 Traditions
 & Festivals

 Music & Dance

 Dress

 Ganseys

 Women's
 Stories

 Superstitions

 Paintings

 Seafood

 Rag Rugs

 Ropework

 Sculpture

 Shells

 Trawl Floats

 Basketwork

 Boats

 Buildings

 Fishing
 Methods

 Bibliography


Buildings



Building 1
Building 1
Building 2
Building 2
Building 3
Building 3
Building 4
Building 4
Building 5
Building 5
Building 6
Building 6
Building 7
Building 7
Building 8
Building 8

Notes on Buildings

There are a wide variety of buildings in fishing communities, just a few of which are illustrated above.

Photos one, two and three are of Hastings. Space was at a premium, just eight square feet per building! Not to be outdone, the fishermen accepted the limitation - and built upwards, thereby creating a unique array of three-storey buildings that make full use of the available space for their net stores. Illustration three shows that boats could be put to good use on shore, in this case for a small house. A differen kind of net store can be seen in photo five, which was taken in Tollesbooth, Essex. Such stores, in various styles, were common in fishing communities, although few now survive.

Photo number four was taken in Lerwick in the Shetland Islands. An upturned boat has been used as a roof for a garage. The use of upturned boats in this way seems to be common, and examples can be seen especially in various parts of the Shetlands and the Orkneys.

Photo seven is of Crovie in NE Scotland. When people were driven off their traditional crofts during the Highland Clearances, some turned to fishing. At first sight Crovie must have looked like an inasupicous place to build a small fishing village - there is barely space for the houses between the cliff face and the sea. But the small community did develop and, while it is no longer dependent on fishing, it is a well-visited site on the NE Scotland tourist route.

Photos six and eight illustrate the use of ornamentation on buildings. Shells are in plentifull supply and buildings covered in them can be found all over Britain. In these two cases picture six is of a small house in the fishing village of Hamnavoe in the Shetlands. Picture eight shows another use of shells as decorations, this time on the window lintels of St Andrew's Church, Newhaven, Scotland.